Hidden Order: The Economics of Everyday Life

Hidden Order The Economics of Everyday Life David Friedman has never taken an economics class in his life Sure he s taught economics at UCLA Chicago Tulane Cornell and Santa Clara but don t hold that against him After all everyone s an ec

  • Title: Hidden Order: The Economics of Everyday Life
  • Author: David D. Friedman
  • ISBN: 9780887308857
  • Page: 159
  • Format: Paperback
  • David Friedman has never taken an economics class in his life Sure, he s taught economics at UCLA Chicago, Tulane, Cornell, and Santa Clara, but don t hold that against him After all, everyone s an economist We all make daily decisions that rely, consciously or not, on an acute understanding of economic theory from picking the fastest checkout tine at the supermarketDavid Friedman has never taken an economics class in his life Sure, he s taught economics at UCLA Chicago, Tulane, Cornell, and Santa Clara, but don t hold that against him After all, everyone s an economist We all make daily decisions that rely, consciously or not, on an acute understanding of economic theory from picking the fastest checkout tine at the supermarket to voting or not voting, from negotiating the best job offer to finding the right person to marry.Hidden Order is an essential guide to rational living, revealing all you need to know to get through each day without being eaten alive Friedman s wise and immensely accessible book is perfect for amateur economists, struggling economics students, young parents and professionals just about anyone who wants a clear cut approach to why we make the choices we do and a sensible strategy for how to make the right ones.

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      Published :2018-09-25T03:44:34+00:00

    One thought on “Hidden Order: The Economics of Everyday Life

    1. Jason

      This books tries to be an economics text book for lay people. I learned quite a bit, but there were many instances where I used the graphs and English descriptions to go, "Oh, he means XYZ in calculus." I'm not sure how clear those passages would be without a good math background (not necessarily calculus, but at least comfort with geometry). In general I feel like I learned a lot about modern economic theory and he had some fun passages that applied economics theory to unusual situations (like [...]

    2. Josh

      Tough read. This is not a _Freakonomics_ or Sowell's _Basic Economics_. You have to engage the econ part of the brain and think hard. (There is actually a part of the brain that fires heavily in Econ majors and rarely in other college students). Therefore I hated it and felt dumb, and missed a lot. But after the first third, he turns away from the blackboard, sits down in his armchair, and gives example after example of application in the real world. That was refreshing and I enjoyed it. Still, [...]

    3. Mark D.

      This book is not what most people would expect from an economics book, even one aimed at the popular audience. From the start, you can tell that the author approaches economics from an unconventional point of view: in his view, economics is not about money. Instead, it turns out to be about value, and how we exchange things of value to obtain others; money need not be involved. When examined from this viewpoint, economics suddenly becomes applicable to study of how we make decisions about nearly [...]

    4. Logan Hughes

      From the title/cover/description, I was expecting a pop-sci, layman-oriented romp through economics with a tight focus on, well, the economics of everyday life: shopping, working for compensation, giving, children's allowances, etc. That's sort of what this is, and I think the author thinks he's writing for a layman audience, but it gets pretty deep into economic theory with lots of charts and figures which lost me pretty quickly. Some of the examples focus on everyday life situations, but just [...]

    5. Tung

      Friedman is a brilliant economist (and son of Milton), and this book is really the forerunner to Freakonomics, in the sense that it was the first of the armchair economics books geared toward discussing data in more interesting and conversational ways. A friend who recommended Hidden Order claimed that it was the book that Freakonomics was trying to be. This is true in the sense that Hidden Order does a far better job of illustrating the pervasiveness of the power of numbers in all aspects of ou [...]

    6. Maria (Ri)

      I finally finished this one. It is pretty heady which is what took me so long to read it. I would only make it through a couple pages at night before drifting off to sleep. It is more of a daytime read! LOL This is not easy economics reading like Freakonomics, etc. This book would be awesome for a college economics class. It has very detailed information like you would learn at the level of a college course, but it is presented in a more entertaining way than a textbook. Having said that, it is [...]

    7. Jen

      I was told by a friend that this is the book "Freakonomics" wished it could be. I heartily disagree. I'm not dumb or brilliant, I like to think I am slightly above average in intelligence and the author completely spoke above me almost the entire time. He tried to explain things simply and ended up making everything more complex, at least to me. I can handle A to B or even A to D, skipping a few steps, but the author jumped from A to Q and expected his readers to be able to follow with no issues [...]

    8. Anna

      One of the random interests I have is unusual perspectives to economics, and this seemed to fit that category. The contents seemed interesting, and some chapters were rather interesting (economics of crime or marriage). But not all chapters were interesting, and it took over a month to finish me the book (still skipping some of the parts with incomprehensible charts). Some chapters, while still interesting in topic, we're written in a boring way. The Undercover Economist is a much more interesti [...]

    9. Diana Marie

      This book is not a quirky, behavioral economics book. Don't be fooled by the title. It is a complete review of everything that I ever learned as an Econ major. While it gets a bit wordy at times and is rather dry, it is a great, condensed version of everything in basic economics - and for this aspect, I give it 5 stars. But since the only part of it that I was truly interested in were the last two chapters, I give it 3 stars. Instead of straight-up economics 101 lectures, I would have preferred [...]

    10. Terry

      Exciting book about an exciting topic. This book had enough depth to cover topics like marginal values and demand curves, and enough practicality mixed in to make for an interesting mix. Friedman has advanced degrees in physics and law and he chooses to teach economics because there are plenty of parallels to draw into this subject. He has a good libertarian bent, but I don't know how an understanding of economics could lead to any other political view.

    11. Kenny

      A very good read, I find this book excessively reductionist, i.e. the explanations (Friedman brings libertarian economics to a popular audience very well) are based on assumptions that are unrealistic (people are purely driven by profit type of thing) but a good introduction to that style of economic thought if you read critically.

    12. Paul Childs

      This book is more complete and detailed than books like the Undercover Economist or Freakonomics, but it is also much harder to read since it is written in a dryer more textbook like fashion. Parts of the book were interesting and other parts tended to make me nod off. This book would probably be best for someone that has a more than passing interest in the subject.

    13. Mark

      Interestingever much denser, and therefore less readable than other economics books I have made it throughmely Armchair Economist, The Drunkard's Walk, and Freakonomics - the remedial member of the family.

    14. Joe Price

      The 5 stars is just for economists or econ students, though I think most other people would put it at 3-4 stars. The book provides a number of intriguing explanations to various decisions such as why we give diamond rings when we get engaged or why the British wore bright red uniforms.

    15. Tyler Nice

      This book is a bit misleading. Not a pop-Econ book. There is some challenging material in here. If you are looking for a fun light Econ read, I recommend looking elsewhere. Try Charles Wheelan's Naked Economics

    16. Ami Iida

      the book is an good economics book but Mankiw introductory economics is great than it.I recommend you to read Mankiw economics.

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